A makeshift hut in Bin Dong camp, one of five temporary shelters for people affected by a dam collapse in southern Laos in July. People here have built the huts as extensions, saying the tents are too hot during the day time / Credit: Visarut Sankham

[Laos] Left to fend for themselves

Even six months after the collapse of the Saddle Dam D section of the Xe Pian-Xe Namnoy hydropower project, which severely destroyed six villages in southern Laos and buried more than 55,200 hectares of land under deep floodwater, the victims still have no certainty about their future.

Read more
The Ton River is seen in Kua village, Laos, on Dec. 24, 2018 / Credit: Somphavanh

[Laos] Poisoned fish worries village as Sangthong district promotes good agricultural practices

The people of Kua village in Sangthong district depend on the Ton River for their livelihoods. It is a prime source of food for the community and provides fishermen an income. It is a source of drinking water for the many diverse animals that live in the area. Locals use the water from the river on a daily basis for drinking, bathing and washing.

Villagers say the number of fish and aquatic life in the Ton River has been on the decline ever since the Chinese-owned Yongzhen Import-Export Production Promotion Company started planting bananas there in 2014.

Read more

[Laos] Six years on, this question still hounds the state: Where is Sombath?

Six years on, the search for truth about Sombath’s enforced disappearance continues while his family and friends, and kindred spirits within and beyond the borders of Laos, firmly hold out hope he is still alive and will surface sooner rather than later. This, notwithstanding the unremitting curtailment of rights and silenced voices that continue to cast a pall of gloom over the prospects of democracy in Laos.

Read more
Soukan Chaithad and Somphone Phimmasone apologizing on Lao National TV. Image via Al Jazeera

[Laos] Critical cyberspace shrinks, mainstream press further muted

Discussions on highly sensitive issues and taboo subjects were limited or missing in the mainstream media. Lao netizens, helped by the country’s Internet boom, have managed to access taboo information banned in the state. But there were some incidents prompted the authorities to call some Facebookers who disseminated news, warning them to share only local official news, which is a big concern over the intrusive and expansive nature of the state internet surveillance network has so far covered.

Read more
x Shield Logo
This Site Is Protected By
The Shield →